President Jeff Iorg

Jeff Iorg: Pastor, author, teacher, leader

Dr. Iorg teaches leadership, preaching, and church ministry courses at Gateway Seminary. He speaks frequently on these subjects in conferences and other venues, including college campuses and leadership seminars. His publications include seven books: The Painful Side of Leadership, The Character of Leadership, Is God Calling Me?, The Case for Antioch, Seasons of a Leader’s Life, Unscripted, Ministry in the New Marriage Culture, and his latest, Leading Major Change in Your Ministry. Iorg has also written dozens of articles and curriculum materials.

Iorg is a graduate of Hardin Simmons University (B.A.), Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (M.Div.) and Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (D.Min.). He is married to Ann, has three adult children, and four grandchildren. His hobbies include reading fiction, cheering on the Oregon Ducks, and searching for the world’s best barbeque restaurant.

To contact the president directly, send him an email at .

President's Blog

A Theology of Volunteers

Over the next three weeks, I want to address the issue of volunteers in churches and ministry organizations. Next week, we will consider issues related to recruiting volunteers. The following week, motivating volunteers. Each week I will also be addressing these issues in greater detail in my podcast.

Culture Crushes Vision

John Maxwell is credited with saying, “Culture eats vision for lunch.” He may have been quoting someone else (if so, let me know and attribution will be given!). Whoever said it, they got it right. No matter how grand your vision, organizational culture can crush it. This was first evident to me while serving as a state executive director.

Why They Stay

My friend Steve Parr (along with Tom Crites) has written a helpful book addressing the issue of why some young adults stay – and others stray – from church participation and/or Christian commitment when they leave home. The book is based on a research project which involved data gathering and interviewing among young adults who had chosen both directions. 

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